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    Colemak - Edition DreymaR

    • Started by DreymaR
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    • From: Oslo, Norway
    • Registered: 13-Dec-2006
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    Colemak - Edition DreymaR!

        Cmk-ANSI-eD_96d-FShui.png?raw=1


    To me, it's the letter block that's the true masterstroke of Colemak and, as it were, Colemak per se:
    • The Caps-to-Backspace is a good idea but that can be used with other layouts too! Or substituted for, e.g., an Extend layer;
       much as the wide/angle ergonomic mods are nice for some users and they don't make a Colemak layout a non-Colemak layout!
    • The symbol key mappings may be kept like in the US layout (which I personally recommend) like the default Colemak layout does,
       or not if that floats your boat. All good so far.
    • When it comes to level 3-4 of the layout (AltGr mappings) they don't do it for me!
       I look in horror at the "tilde mappings" of missed opportunities, and many letters are in unintuitive places.

    I want more. I want to
    • use dead key accents that mostly conform to the Compose sequences in Linux because they make a lot of sense
    • improve on a few of them; e.g., typing " to compose umlaut is über-silly - it's a very common accent and shouldn't require a Shift!
    • be able to type the accent characters `~^ directly as in the normal layout; the dead keys should be on additional AltGr mappings
    • keep the letter keys free of dead keys for consistency/clarity and to keep from triggering them while typing normally
    • have useful special non-accent letters and symbols (e.g., æ œ ß ð þ ŋ ʒ ° † © …) readily available on AltGr mappings
    • make mappings easy to remember based on similarity to existing letters/symbols, or failing that, shape/position
    • use my locale special letters (in my case, øåæ in decreasing order of importance) easily without breaking the main Colemak setup

    Above and below you can see images of my proposed mappings!

    I added a few of the most needed Greek letters (the first ones, π and µ), and some symbol mappings should be familiar to Macintosh users but I've considered how useful and common different symbols really are. It's not a full latin-script layout as it stands; for that I'll need more layers and I haven't yet gotten around to that. I'd like to eventually have the most common IPA phonetic symbols available for instance, like the Neo layout has. I have some nifty ideas.

    Some latin letters are really very uncommon or even deprecated, like the Kra which was discontinued in 1973. Keep in mind that the three key locations I've used for øåæ are up for grabs for people who need their own characters (ø and å are also available as dead key combinations with the slash and ring accents respectively – although the slash dead key doesn't always work as expected under Linux). This and a few AltGr mappings should ideally be the only modifications necessary to produce a slew of different nationalized layouts! (See my Locale topic.)

    The Greek letters could have their own layer so that the whole Greek alphabet would be accessible – or it can be done simply by layout switching to a phonetic Greek Colemak layout. Greek is much more commonly needed for symbols and short quotes than the other non-latin scripts are, so having a Greek dead key also makes sense for that purpose.

    In the future, I may want extra overlay/extend layers like the one I already have with navigation/editing and numeric keypad. I may want the CapsLock key with modifiers to select those. There should also be a few more dead keys in addition to accents, currency and math/science; maybe for ligatures, latin scripts (such as the many African ones), and IPA phonetics.


    UPDATE 2012-07-08:

    • Some Greek gave way to provide a set of arrows (←↑↓→) and the en/em dashes on NEI. The important β µ π were kept.
    • The ‹›«» quote marks are on the same fingers as the <> keys for consistency. The ‚‘’„“” quotes are near the 2 key which holds the " in some layouts.
    • Most signs have intuitive positions I feel (based on sound like Ʒʒ Ŋŋ, or shape like many symbols), and some related keys are next to each other.
    • For the "fluid" keys (mainly HJKL, VB and the brackets) I settled on some Greek and IPA signs in this version.


    UPDATE 2012-07-26:

    I think the IPA signs I tried to get into the previous version are too odd for some users and that'll confuse them. Also, more keys are needed to get even a simple English IPA up and running. That'll come later, with the addition of new dead keys I'm planning. So I reinstated some Greek and latin letters.

    Incidentally, this version is more similar to the standard Colemak! :)

    The first Greek letters are commonly used for describing α/β/γ radiation, β versions of software and such. So I've let them supplement the π and µ. Of course, other Greek letters are needed too (theta/phi/psi for angles, nu/omega for speeds, Omega for resistance; the list goes on and on) and that can't quite be helped. So I keep the full Greek phonetic Colemak as a separate map layer and switch to it as needed (in Linux/xkb, you can define a key for switching to the last layout group temporarily!).

    I brought back superscript 2 and 3 on the 2 and 3 keys. They're quite commonly needed, more than superscript 1 (which must go since the 1 key is full). They should also be available on a dead key together with a more complete set of superscripts! But having those two available more easily makes sense.

    The 4 key gets the sterling/pound sign. The generic currency sign will eventually be a currency++ dead key! The Yen sign is missing in action right now, but the dead key will take care of that (my PKL file already has one, but it's not in my xkb files yet).

    On the apostrophe key is now a single prime symbol. It's used for music, maths and other things. Its double/triple/etc siblings are missing, pending a maths/science dead key.

    The c-cedilla is so much used in the Romance languages that I think it deserves a "direct" AltGr mapping on the phonetically related K key. This key is still one of the "up for grabs" keys for locale layouts since you can also type a ç with the dead key (AltGr+comma then c).

    The L-stroke is quite nice to have around too, for Polish and Sápmi languages for instance. The stroke dead key is another path to it, but that's broken right now in Linux/xkb? Hopefully it'll get fixed soon. Other languages need other stroked letters like Ŧŧ and Đđ (different from Ðð!).

    Esh is moved to the phonetically and geometrically intuitive J key. The H key is pretty much "up for grabs" but it holds schwa and epsilon which can be useful in some cases.

    The keys I recommend using for variants are primarily K H L and J, in that order. They're quite easily reached with the AltGr key (except J which is a stretch) and bunched nicely together.


    UPDATE 2014-01-20:

    • Again, a minor tweak. As mentioned, I found myself needing the bullet glyph a lot and the Greek β very rarely.
    • Also, I've been using the ÷× signs but hardly ever the Greek γ or even µ (although I know that's useful).

    So, I switched AltGr and AltGr+Shift positions for the H V B M keys, bringing the Greek a little more to the background. The ε and ə didn't have to swap places but I did it because it seems more consistent. The π is still on unshifted AltGr+p and αδ are on the same key as before, so it's not entirely consistent no matter what – but given how rarely these oddball Greek letters are needed (by me at least) it's okay. Again, you can always keep a proper Greek layout handy; the phonetic Colemak layouts are like add-on mapping layers really.


    UPDATE 2014-10-26

    • € added on the E key in response to popular demand
    • ↓ moved to the M key for shift layer consistency with the other arrows
    • the "orphan" schwa/epsilon on the "up-for-grabs" H key replaced by Ħħ (more consistent)
    • Win/PKL: µ on the 5 key as a Greek dead key; AltGr+'=' doubles as doubleacute+math/science dead key; other dead key additions


    UPDATE 2018-02-23

    • Ææ now on the ]} key for consistency with Åå and Øø (from the Norwegian/Danish layout)
    • ↑ moved to the N key so that NM form an ↑↓ pair which is nice with or without the Curl(DH) mod


    As also seen in my Big Bag Of Tricks Topic and above, this is the current state of Colemak[eD]:

        Cmk-ISO-eD-Angle_96d-FShui.png?raw=1
        Fig.: The Colemak [edition DreymaR] layout, using different lv3-4 mappings from the standard Colemak.
        Shown with the ZXCVB_ Angle-ISO ergonomic mod (see my sig topic), dead key emphasis and color-coded proposed fingering.

        Cmk-ISO-eD-CurlAWide_96d-FShui.png?raw=1
        Fig.: Colemak [edition DreymaR] with the ISO Curl(DH)AngleWide ergonomic mods – a.k.a. Colemak-CAW[eD] (see my sig topic).

    As you can see many parts of the setup are intuitive. Among the fuzzier points are the J L K H and bracket keys, which I consider "up for grabs" when making locale layouts so I can't keep anything terribly important there. I've settled on some Greek and signs that are available otherwise; for proper Greek typing you'll need a full layout anyway – I recommend a phonetic layout accessible by switch key. For hit-and-run Greek symbols there's now a Greek dead key on AltGr+5 (Windows/PKL only for now).

    Last edited by DreymaR (06-Jul-2018 09:46:15)

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    This is my first official version (Linux/xkb - I'll make it for other OSes too)

    Hitting the AltGr key to get the two less common special characters may at first seem impractical for people used to national layouts but I promise that I don't think twice about it these days and for letters that are only used less than 1% of the time (keeping in mind that most of us type some English too) that's really the way it should be! My 'ø' position is fairly easily reachable and perfectly all right for the most common of your special letters.

    Below is a section from the X11 xkb definitions if you want to try this out on Linux! For a full install of it as a separate 'Colemak-ED' layout, head over to my topic about the Wide mod for a patch-and-script solution for Ubuntu 11.10 (a direct link can be found here). Or use a quick-and-dirty approach and put the below code into your /usr/share/X11/xkb/symbols/us file and change the 'xkb_symbols' line to "colemak" while changing the original colemak's line to "colemak-orig" or something (you won't be able to use it then; maybe you'd like to replace some other layout like the Canadian one instead!). After that, restart and you should be good to go (if not - try clearing out /var/lib/xkb before the restart).

    [edit: Warning – the below section is outdated!]

    Spoiler:
    // Colemak symbols for xkb on X.Org Server 7.x
    // 2006-01-01 Shai Coleman, https://colemak.com/ . Public domain.
    // 2011-08-26 Øystein Bech "DreymaR" Gadmar: New layers 3+4 [beta!]; 'Colemak-EditionDreymaR'.
    // DreymaR's additional design goals:
    // * Keeping the first two levels of Colemak intact! This is what I think of as Colemak per se.
    // * Dead keys easily accessible as unshifted AltGr+symbol keys; common ones in good positions.
    // * Added symbols/greek (much like the Macintosh has) allowing common math/tech/etc typing.
    // * Added letters/quotes allowing many of the major latin scripts to be written.
    // * Positions of letters and symbols should as far as possible be easily remembered.
    // * The brackets and LSGT keys hold the most common local special letter glyphs for your locale.
    //     (Here I've used the Scandinavian oe/aring/ae special letters - replace as needed!)
    
    partial alphanumeric_keys
    xkb_symbols "colemak-ed" {
    //    include "us(basic)"
        name[Group1]= "English/Intl - Colemak-ED";
    
        // Alphanumeric section
        key <TLDE> { [         grave,    asciitilde,          dead_tilde,           0x1002248 ] };
        key <AE01> { [             1,        exclam,       dead_belowdot,          exclamdown ] };
        key <AE02> { [             2,            at,           dead_hook,            integral ] };
        key <AE03> { [             3,    numbersign,            sterling,           0x1002044 ] };
        key <AE04> { [             4,        dollar,            function,                cent ] };
        key <AE05> { [             5,       percent,            EuroSign,           0x1002030 ] };
        key <AE06> { [             6,   asciicircum,     dead_circumflex,   partialderivative ] };
        key <AE07> { [             7,     ampersand,          dead_caron,               caron ] };
        key <AE08> { [             8,      asterisk,         dead_ogonek,      periodcentered ] };
        key <AE09> { [             9,     parenleft,          dead_breve,            infinity ] };
        key <AE10> { [             0,    parenright,      dead_abovering,  enfilledcircbullet ] };
        key <AE11> { [         minus,    underscore,         dead_macron,           plusminus ] };
        key <AE12> { [         equal,          plus,           dead_horn,            notequal ] };
        //  U2248 approx equal; U2044 solidus/shilling; U2030 per mille
        key <AD01> { [             q,             Q,         Greek_omega,         Greek_OMEGA ] };
        key <AD02> { [             w,             W,            Greek_pi,         Greek_SIGMA ] };
        key <AD03> { [             f,             F,           0x1002039,       guillemotleft ] };
        key <AD04> { [             p,             P,           0x100203A,      guillemotright ] };
        key <AD05> { [             g,             G,         Greek_gamma,         Greek_GAMMA ] };
        key <AD06> { [             j,             J,         Greek_delta,         Greek_DELTA ] };
        key <AD07> { [             l,             L, leftsinglequotemark, leftdoublequotemark ] };
        key <AD08> { [             u,             U,rightsinglequotemark,rightdoublequotemark ] };
        key <AD09> { [             y,             Y,           Greek_phi,                 yen ] };
        key <AD10> { [     semicolon,         colon,      dead_diaeresis,            ellipsis ] };
        key <AD11> { [   bracketleft,     braceleft,               aring,               Aring ] };
        key <AD12> { [  bracketright,    braceright,                  ae,                  AE ] };
        key <BKSL> { [     backslash,           bar,          dead_grave,           brokenbar ] };
        //  U2039/U203A single guillemets
        key <AC01> { [             a,             A,         Greek_alpha,         ordfeminine ] };
        key <AC02> { [             r,             R,          registered,           trademark ] };
        key <AC03> { [             s,             S,              ssharp,             section ] };
        key <AC04> { [             t,             T,               thorn,               THORN ] };  
        key <AC05> { [             d,             D,                 eth,                 ETH ] };
        key <AC06> { [             h,             H,  singlelowquotemark,  doublelowquotemark ] };
        key <AC07> { [             n,             N,                 eng,                 ENG ] };
        key <AC08> { [             e,             E,       Greek_epsilon,               schwa ] };
        key <AC09> { [             i,             I,              endash,              emdash ] };
        key <AC10> { [             o,             O,              degree,           masculine ] };
        key <AC11> { [    apostrophe,     quotedbl,          dead_acute,    dead_doubleacute ] };
        //  
        key <AB01> { [             z,             Z,           0x1000292,           0x10001B7 ] };
        key <AB02> { [             x,             X,              dagger,        doubledagger ] };
        key <AB03> { [             c,             C,           copyright,            currency ] };
        key <AB04> { [             v,             V,             notsign,            division ] };
        key <AB05> { [             b,             B,          Greek_beta,         Greek_theta ] };
        key <AB06> { [             k,             K,         Greek_kappa,           paragraph ] };
        key <AB07> { [             m,             M,                  mu,            multiply ] };
        key <AB08> { [         comma,          less,        dead_cedilla,       lessthanequal ] };
        key <AB09> { [        period,       greater,       dead_abovedot,    greaterthanequal ] };
        key <AB10> { [         slash,      question,         dead_stroke,        questiondown ] };
        //  U0292/U01B7 letter ezh/EZH
        key <LSGT> { [        oslash,      Ooblique,                  oe,                  OE ] };
        key <SPCE> { [         space,         space,        nobreakspace,        nobreakspace ] };
        key <CAPS> { [     BackSpace,     BackSpace,           Caps_Lock,           Caps_Lock ] };
    
        include "level3(ralt_switch)"
    };
    
    
    // NOTES:
    // Missing: U2639/U263A sad/smilingface; U27E8/27E9 Chevrons/brackets; U017F long s
    //     U0283 esh; Greek_theta/psi/PI/PHI/THETA; some African
    //     (d-tail; turned e/E; latin epsilon/gamma; esh; italic v; open o/O; wynn/yogh)
    // Oddly placed?: 'integral'/'notsign' on '2'/'v' (shape)?
    //     Greek_delta/DELTA/pi/theta on 'j/J/w/B'?
    // Rare/dropped: U25CA lozenge (rare); kra (Inuktitut/IPA); latin gamma (Berber etc)
    //     numerosign (mostly Cyrillic; use ordfem.); squareroot (unworkable)
    //     U2033/U2032 double-/prime (cheat with acute/doubleacute instead?!)
    // For compose/deadkeys: ligatures (fi/fl/ij); fractions; more latin/IPA/currencies
    // Does dead_stroke (for d/g/h/l) work?!? Turkish idotless is on dead_abovedot, OK.
    // Unused dead_keys (could make them special dead keys like user 'ghen' suggests?):
    //     iota, voiced_sound, semivoiced_sound
    //     Idea: A dead_Greek key instead of a few glyphs! And a latin/IPA/currency one!

    No thoughts on this? I realize that individual preferences can and will play a large part in this matter, but at the same time I feel that I've worked out something fairly intuitive and generally interesting. :)

    Last edited by DreymaR (06-Jul-2018 09:50:43)

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    I don't think the official AltGr layer is great either, but I'm afraid it's good enough for my limited use.

    I think, if you want a higher chance of feedback, separate the wide-mod from the rest. It is confusing and people who might want a better AltGr layer might not want the wide-mod, just like you only want parts of Colemak.

    Last edited by erw (02-Nov-2011 16:34:41)
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    You're right - I thought about that bit but didn't do anything about it yet. Now if only my Ubuntu 11.10 hadn't stupidly gone and lost its keyboard model setting (by GUI) functionality I'd have this sorted out in no time... :)

    I've changed it now. Here's the WideErgo(1b) image too, for completeness:
    Colemak-ED-wide-1b_Linux.gif

    [Update: I've made a nice Inkscape vector image of the current state of the layout in the main topic post above.]

    Last edited by DreymaR (28-Jul-2012 11:16:11)

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    UPDATE 2012-07-08 [outdated]

    This is the early July version of the Colemak - edition DreymaR AltGr mappings:

       Cmk-ISO-eD-v201207-Angle_90d-FingerShui.png
       Fig.: The Colemak [edition DreymaR] layout, using different lv3-4 mappings from the standard Colemak. July 2012 version
       Shown with the ZXCVB_ Angle ergonomic mod (see my sig topic), dead key emphasis and color-coded proposed fingering.

    Some Greek gave way to provide a set of arrows (←↑↓→) and the en/em dashes on NEI. The important β µ π were kept.

    The ‹›«» quote marks are on the same fingers as the <> keys for consistency. The ‚‘’„“” quotes are near the 2 key which holds the " in some layouts.

    Most signs have intuitive positions I feel (based on sound like Ʒʒ Ŋŋ, or shape like many symbols), and some related keys are next to each other.

    For the "fluid" keys (mainly HJKL, VB and the brackets) I settled on some Greek and IPA signs in this version.

    These IPA mappings should provide the means to write simple English IPA at least, when complemented by a "turned"/misc dead key?

    That integral sign on the 2 key seems somewhat unintuitive. I couldn't decide what else should go there.

    Last edited by DreymaR (20-Jan-2014 13:43:51)

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    UPDATE 2012-07-26 [outdated]

    As seen in my Big Bag Of Tricks Topic, I modified the Colemak[eD] some more leading to this:

       Cmk-ISO-eD-v201208-AWide35_90d-FingerShui.png?raw=1
       Fig.: The Colemak [edition DreymaR] layout, using different lv3-4 mappings from the standard Colemak.
       Shown with the ISO Angle/Wide ergonomic mod (see my sig topic), dead key emphasis and color-coded proposed fingering.

    I think the IPA signs I tried to get into the previous version are too odd for some users and that'll confuse them. Also, more keys are needed to get even a simple English IPA up and running. That'll come later, with the addition of new dead keys I'm planning. So I reinstated some Greek and latin letters.

    Incidentally, this version is more similar to the standard Colemak! :)

    The first Greek letters are commonly used for describing α/β/γ radiation, β versions of software and such. So I've let them supplement the π and µ. Of course, other Greek letters are needed too (theta/phi/psi for angles, nu/omega for speeds, Omega for resistance; the list goes on and on) and that can't quite be helped. So I keep the full Greek phonetic Colemak as a separate map layer and switch to it as needed (in Linux/xkb, you can define a key for switching to the last layout group temporarily!).

    I brought back superscript 2 and 3 on the 2 and 3 keys. They're quite commonly needed, more than superscript 1 (which must go since the 1 key is full). They should also be available on a dead key together with a more complete set of superscripts! But having those two available more easily makes sense.

    The 4 key gets the sterling/pound sign. The generic currency sign will eventually be a currency++ dead key! The Yen sign is missing in action right now, but the dead key will take care of that (my PKL file already has one, but it's not in my xkb files yet).

    On the apostrophe key is now a single prime symbol. It's used for music, maths and other things. Its double/triple/etc siblings are missing, pending a maths/science dead key.

    The c-cedilla is so much used in the Romance languages that I think it deserves a "direct" AltGr mapping on the phonetically related K key. This key is still one of the "up for grabs" keys for locale layouts since you can also type a ç with the dead key (AltGr+comma then c).

    The L-stroke is quite nice to have around too, for Polish and Sápmi languages for instance. The stroke dead key is another path to it, but that's broken right now in Linux/xkb? Hopefully it'll get fixed soon. Other languages need other stroked letters like Ŧŧ and Đđ (different from Ðð!).

    Esh is moved to the phonetically and geometrically intuitive J key. The H key is pretty much "up for grabs" but it holds schwa and epsilon which can be useful in some cases.

    The keys I recommend using for variants are primarily K H L and J, in that order. They're quite easily reached with the AltGr key (except J which is a stretch) and bunched nicely together.

    Last edited by DreymaR (22-Mar-2017 16:28:50)

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    Observations:
    • I often use the Bullet symbol. I hardly ever need the Greek Beta.
    • The arrows being on Shifted AltGr keys is somewhat annoying, but the en and em dashes are too important to let go.
    • A 1 superscript would've been kinda nice but it simply didn't fit in. I'll have to make do with the dead key method!

    Any other thoughts? Hmmm... :)

    Last edited by DreymaR (26-Nov-2012 19:45:21)

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    Is it just that I don't know the grammatically proper use of En and Em dashes, or I'm right: I think you would use either one but not both. It's a matter of typing style, isn't it?

    On second thought I might be wrong. If you like to use Em dash, then you might need the En dash as well for typing stuff like date ranges (2010 – 2011), but not the other way around. I use – (en-dash) and not — (em-dash) in typing.

    Last edited by pafkata90 (27-Nov-2012 21:54:44)
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    You use them for different things, en dash, em dash and hyphen are all distinct.  The hyphen is substituted often I guess, as the glyphs aren't found easily on the keyboard.  Like the good old days of ASCII.  Being a Brit, I'm more inclined to use brackets and punctuation instead of em dashes.  Never found the need for the en dash myself.

    http://www.mentalfloss.com/difference/e … s-em-dash/

    Never heard of the interrobang either!

    --
    Physicians deafen our ears with the Honorificabilitudinitatibus of their heavenly Panacaea, their sovereign Guiacum.

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    Hm. I was sure that you can use entirely en dashes instead of em dashes, as long as you leave spaces between the dash and the word.

    Nevermind, the thread is for something else. I was just thinking you might be able to keep just the one you use, but... Maybe you need both. I'll probably read more about using them when I've got some free time.

    Last edited by pafkata90 (28-Nov-2012 00:18:17)
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    In classical US typography the em dash is used without spaces around—like this—whereas in Europe (all, or just the places I know of which mainly means Scandinavia?) the en dash is employed with spaces – like this – to denote an interrupt. In ranges, the en dash is used without spaces: 1914–1918.

    So to get back on topic: Yeah, I consider them fairly important – even though I as a non-American don't use the em specimen.

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    UPDATE 2014-01-20 [outdated]

    Again, a minor tweak. As mentioned, I found myself needing the bullet glyph a lot and the Greek β very rarely. Also, I've been using the ÷× signs but hardly ever the Greek γ or even µ (although I know that's useful).

       Cmk-ISO-eD-v201401-Angle_90d-FingerShui.png?raw=1
       Fig.: The Colemak [edition DreymaR] layout, using different lv3-4 mappings from the standard Colemak.
       Shown with the ZXCVB_ Angle ergonomic mod (see my sig topic), dead key emphasis and color-coded proposed fingering.

    So, I switched AltGr and AltGr+Shift positions for the H V B M keys, bringing the Greek a little more to the background. The ε and ə didn't have to swap places but I did it because it seems more consistent. The π is still on unshifted AltGr+p and αδ are on the same key as before, so it's not entirely consistent no matter what – but given how rarely these oddball Greek letters are needed (by me at least) it's okay. Again, you can always keep a proper Greek layout handy; the phonetic Colemak layouts are like add-on mapping layers really.

    Last edited by DreymaR (22-Mar-2017 16:31:55)

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    • From: Oslo, Norway
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    UPDATE 2014-10-26

    Another minor tweak. In many locale variants the € sign is on the E key so it would be lost in the Colemak[eD] "keep local symbols" scheme. I also felt that up/down arrows on different shift states of AltGr+E was annoying. The half-baked schwa/epsilon on the H key were removed for Ħħ which is useful mostly for Maltese but the ħ doubles as a dirac's constant symbol (in italics); this key is one of the replaceable ones anyway and with a working stroke dead key the Ħħ can be made using that. Finally, the µ sign is now a Greek dead key on the 5 key and the dead keys have been expanded a lot with science/maths, ring symbols, superscript (acute) and subscript (grave) symbols and more (implemented in PKL but not yet xkb).

    Schwa and epsilon rightly belong on Greek and Latin/IPA dead keys; I've now made a Greek dead key for PKL at least.

       Cmk-ISO-eD-v201410-Angle_90d_FShui.png?raw=1
       Fig.: The Colemak [edition DreymaR] layout, using different lv3-4 mappings from the standard Colemak.
       Shown with the ZXCVB_ Angle ergonomic mod (see my sig topic), dead key emphasis and color-coded proposed fingering.

    • € added on the E key in response to popular demand
    • ↓ moved to the M key for shift layer consistency with the other arrows
    • the "orphan" schwa/epsilon on the "up-for-grabs" H key replaced by Ħħ (more consistent)
    • Win/PKL: µ on the 5 key as a Greek dead key; AltGr+'=' doubles as doubleacute+math/science dead key; other dead key additions

    Last edited by DreymaR (22-Mar-2017 16:33:10)

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