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    An AI bot's view of keyboard layout design (long)

    • Started by stevep99
    • 1 Replies:
    • Reputation: 116
    • From: UK
    • Registered: 14-Apr-2014
    • Posts: 969

    In case you haven't heard of it, ChatGPT is a AI chat bot that has received quite a lot of publicity recently.
    Just for fun I decided to experiment with it, and had a conversation with it about keyboard layouts and Colemak.

    It's quite impressive in a lot of ways, it does seem to follow conversations over multiple interactions quite well, but also makes some strange errors too, as well as being overly repetitive at times.

    I'll post the full transcript here, as it's a worthwhile read in places and is quite amusing too. Here's a link to the chat bot in case you want to try it yourself.

    What are the important design considerations when designing an alternative keyboard layout?

    When designing an alternative keyboard layout, there are several important design considerations that need to be taken into account. These include the overall size and shape of the keyboard, the position of the keys and how they are arranged, the key travel distance and how the keys feel when they are pressed, the type of switch used for each key, and the ergonomics of the keyboard, including the angle at which the keyboard is tilted and the height at which it is positioned relative to the user. Additionally, the layout of the keys should be intuitive and easy to learn, with the most commonly used keys being positioned in a way that is easy for the user to access.

    Which key positions are the easier to access?

    When designing a keyboard layout, it is generally best to position the keys that are used most frequently in a way that is easy for the user to access. This typically means placing these keys in the center of the keyboard, where they can be easily reached by the user's fingers without having to stretch or move their hands too much. Some common keys that are used frequently and therefore should be placed in an easily accessible position include the letters A, S, D, and F on the left side of the keyboard, and the letters J, K, L, and semicolon on the right side. Additionally, the space bar and enter key should also be placed in a central and easily accessible location.

    But J and K are not frequent letters in English

    You are correct that the letters J and K are not used as frequently as some other letters in the English language. However, they are still important keys on the keyboard and are commonly used in a variety of contexts. For example, J and K are often used in combination with other keys, such as the shift key, to create uppercase versions of those letters. Additionally, J and K are often used as part of common keyboard shortcuts, such as the "JKL" keys that are used to navigate between items on a webpage or in a document. For these reasons, it is still important to position the J and K keys in a way that is easy for the user to access.

    Even taking into account the other contexts you mentioned, such as combining with shift etc, J and K are still a lot less frequent that other keys, such as E and T.  Logically then, it would make more sense to have E and T in the most accessible locations rather than J and K?

    While it is true that the letters E and T are used more frequently than J and K in the English language, there are other factors to consider when determining the most appropriate location for these keys on the keyboard. One important consideration is the position of the keys on the QWERTY keyboard layout, which is the most commonly used keyboard layout in the English-speaking world. On the QWERTY keyboard, the letters J and K are positioned next to the letter L, which is the most commonly used letter in the English language. This means that the J, K, and L keys are often used together, and positioning them in close proximity to each other can help to improve the efficiency and speed of typing. In contrast, the letters E and T are positioned further away from each other on the QWERTY keyboard, which can make them more difficult to access quickly when typing.

    You said L is the most commonly used letter in the English language. Are you sure about that?

    I apologize if my previous response was misleading. While the letter L is commonly used in the English language, it is not the most commonly used letter overall. In fact, the most commonly used letter in the English language is actually the letter E. This is because the letter E is used very frequently in the English language, appearing in many common words and phrases. Additionally, the letter E is also often used as a grammatical marker, such as in the formation of the past tense or the contraction of the words "is" and "has." For these reasons, the letter E is the most commonly used letter in the English language.

    I agree with you that E is the most common letter, and I also agree with you that the most common letters should be the easiest to type keys. So, doesn't it follow that for an efficient keyboard layout, E should be moved to an easier to type spot?

    While it is true that the most commonly used letters in the English language should be positioned in a way that is easy for the user to access, it is also important to consider the overall layout of the keyboard and how it will be used. In the case of the QWERTY keyboard layout, the position of the letter E is already in an easily accessible location, as it is positioned in the center of the keyboard and can be easily reached by the user's fingers without having to move their hands too much. Additionally, the QWERTY keyboard layout is the most commonly used keyboard layout in the English-speaking world, and the vast majority of people are already familiar with its layout. For these reasons, it is generally not necessary to move the letter E to a different location on the keyboard in order to make it more easily accessible.

    What do you think of Colemak?

    Colemak is an alternative keyboard layout that was designed to be more efficient and comfortable to use than the QWERTY keyboard layout, which is the most commonly used keyboard layout in the English-speaking world. The Colemak keyboard layout is designed to reduce the distance that the user's fingers need to travel in order to type common letters and words, which can help to reduce fatigue and improve typing speed and accuracy. Additionally, the Colemak keyboard layout also includes several other features that are designed to improve ergonomics, such as the placement of common punctuation marks and the arrangement of the keys in a way that is more natural for the user's hands. Overall, the Colemak keyboard layout is a well-designed and effective alternative to the QWERTY keyboard layout, and many people find it to be more comfortable and efficient to use.

    Would you say Colemak is a better layout than Qwerty then?

    Whether or not Colemak is a better keyboard layout than QWERTY is a matter of personal preference, and it ultimately depends on the individual user and how they use the keyboard. Some people may find that the Colemak keyboard layout is more comfortable and efficient for them to use, while others may prefer the QWERTY keyboard layout or another alternative keyboard layout. It is worth noting that the QWERTY keyboard layout is the most commonly used keyboard layout in the English-speaking world, and many people are already familiar with its layout. This means that it may be easier for some people to switch to an alternative keyboard layout if they are already comfortable with the QWERTY layout. Ultimately, the best keyboard layout is the one that works best for the individual user and meets their specific needs and preferences.

    Do you think it would be possible to design some objective metrics for measuring the efficiency of different keyboard layouts, to determine which ones were best?

    It is possible to design objective metrics for measuring the efficiency of different keyboard layouts, although the specific metrics that would be used would depend on the specific goals and criteria being considered. Some potential metrics for measuring the efficiency of keyboard layouts could include the distance that the user's fingers need to travel in order to type common letters and words, the time it takes the user to complete a typing test using the keyboard layout, and the number of errors the user makes while typing. Other potential metrics could include the ergonomics of the keyboard layout, such as the angle at which the keyboard is tilted and the position of the keys relative to the user's hands. By using a combination of these and other metrics, it would be possible to objectively compare the efficiency of different keyboard layouts and determine which ones are the best.

    Last edited by stevep99 (11-Dec-2022 18:21:54)

    Using Colemak-DH with Seniply.

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    • From: Viken, Norway
    • Registered: 13-Dec-2006
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    Interesting indeed. Hella funny defense for the QWERTY J and K positions!   ̄(=⌒ᆺ⌒=) ̄

    *** Learn Colemak in 2–5 steps with Tarmak! ***
    *** Check out my Big Bag of Keyboard Tricks for Win/Linux/TMK... ***

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