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    Another anotherlayout for your reference

    • Started by 申子岭
    • 4 Replies:
    • Reputation: 0
    • From: Shanghai, Mainland China
    • Registered: 01-Jun-2022
    • Posts: 2

    To the honored Mr. Shai Coleman,

    After seeing the post by Seruxie, I sort of found the courage to write something in the forum. This is a layout designed by myself...

    q w y d f j u p l
    a s e t g h n i o r
    z x c v b k m

    This layout is easy to learn, but not as fast. It has a low rate of changes of positions, fingers or hands. To reach a higher speed, try Niro. Asset also achieves something similar to this layout, but in a more complexed manner.

    The problems of this layout is the probably the UN and the LO bigrams. The U is overall filled with problems, since vowels are not supposed to be typed with indexes... Comparing to Norman, it puts E and D away on different fingers.

    The most satisfying word with this layout is probably "transparent".



    In this topic, I also want to talk about the changes I have done to my computer with Sharpkeys and other things about typing, so the following content isn't really related to the layout mentioned above...

    I don't know why, but my computer's MSKLC is not running properly, so I just stuck to using Sharpkeys. I use an ANSI without numberpad, and moved both hands away from each other for one digit. The symbols are now in the middle. Enter is delete, and right Shift is Enter. Since the hands are moved away, my thumbs can reach the Alt keys now, and I use them for the Shifts.

    I am also developing an inputting method for the English language using DuoDuo Chinese IME Generater, and the softwares are also not running properly... The basic idea is that one key can represent many characters. On a QWERTY, it can be so represented:

    To type Q or A, type A.
    To type W, S or Z, type S.
    To type E, D or X, type D.
    To type R, F or C, type F.
    To type T, G or V, type G.
    To type Y, H or B, type H.
    To type U, J or N, type J.
    To type I, K or M, type K.
    To type O, L or P, type L.

    (I type Z with ring, not pinky.)

    For example, the word "remember" can be typed as "fdkdkhdf".

    Use spacebar when you have finished typing a word. If the target word is on the second place on the waiting list, use ; to select. The third can be selected by the R key, and the fourth by U. After selection, you do not need to type spacebar again. To turn off or switch on the inputting method, use the Left Shift key.

    Of course, this layout can be optimized so that the repeated code rate would reduce.



    That's all I want to blabber about... Thank you so much

    Spoiler:

    for wasting time

    on this post! Sorry for my terrible English!

    space.bilibili.com/518836771

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    • Reputation: 116
    • From: UK
    • Registered: 14-Apr-2014
    • Posts: 969

    I can think of a minor adjustment you could be made to your layout; if you rotate U > Y > P,  you avoid same-finger UN, PI and YE (common in "yes") and instead have same-finger UE, IY and PN - which are all less common.

    Is there any reason you are going down this route instead of using Colemak?

    The input method with multiple options for each word is an interesting idea. Ironically, it would work better for Qwerty since it allows entirely (or mostly) home-row typing. If you are using an optimized layout, you are mostly on the home row anyway, so the need for this quickly falls away. The main drawback is the having to pick from multiple options after each word, and the necessary software support to handle this. There might also be times when you want to disable the feature, such as typing acronyms or non-words (passwords, random IDs, etc). I can imagine it being a viable option for Qwerty users if the software implementation was good though.

    Last edited by stevep99 (13-Jan-2023 11:11:15)

    Using Colemak-DH with Seniply.

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    • Reputation: 189
    • From: Viken, Norway
    • Registered: 13-Dec-2006
    • Posts: 5,278

    You're quoting some old layouts that has since been surpassed. If you're interested in layout development, I suggest joining the Alternate Keyboard Layout server on Discord. They work with modern analysis principles and ideas.

    I agree with SteveP that I see no reason for you to choose what you made over Colemak. Please explain what it is you're trying to achieve?

    *** Learn Colemak in 2–5 steps with Tarmak! ***
    *** Check out my Big Bag of Keyboard Tricks for Win/Linux/TMK... ***

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    • Reputation: 0
    • From: Shanghai, Mainland China
    • Registered: 01-Jun-2022
    • Posts: 2
    DreymaR said:

    You're quoting some old layouts that has since been surpassed. If you're interested in layout development, I suggest joining the Alternate Keyboard Layout server on Discord. They work with modern analysis principles and ideas.

    I agree with SteveP that I see no reason for you to choose what you made over Colemak. Please explain what it is you're trying to achieve?



    Yes, it is indeed worse than Colemak in terms of using, but is easier to learn. It is certainly frustrating when you learn a layout while still having the need to type a lot. This layout is milder than Colemak.

    space.bilibili.com/518836771

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    • Reputation: 189
    • From: Viken, Norway
    • Registered: 13-Dec-2006
    • Posts: 5,278

    In the parts of the alt-layout community that I frequent, many users seem to want more changes than Colemak provides, rather than less. I can understand this sentiment: You spend some weeks or months learning a layout, but you may use it for the rest of your life! Naturally layout quality will be far more important than ease of learning in the long run.

    My approach to wanting more is to offer "expansion modules": You can learn and use further ergo mods like DH (CurlAngle), Wide and Sym, extremely useful layer techniques like dead keys and Extend, special keys like Repeat and Compose – etc etc. These matter more than the small and uncertain benefits of one fully optimized layout over another, I believe.

    At the same time, I get that learners may feel that the task of relearning even 17 keys seems daunting. Many users have reported great satisfaction with the Tarmak approach. I'd much sooner recommend that someone take a gradual approach towards a really good layout, than taking a half-hearted step to a half-baked layout.

    For this reason, I'm very much against the advocacy for Norman and Minimak and those try-to-get-enough-from-less attempts. They invariably fail at making a sufficiently good layout for long-time use. And even when changing only half as many keys as Colemak does, they are still a hassle to learn and end up being of quite poor quality so it's not like such outlandish claims as "80% effect for 20% effort" come even remotely close to the truth.

    Last edited by DreymaR (16-Jan-2023 15:23:55)

    *** Learn Colemak in 2–5 steps with Tarmak! ***
    *** Check out my Big Bag of Keyboard Tricks for Win/Linux/TMK... ***

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