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Colemak via Tarmak

  • Started by bph
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  • From: Oslo, Norway
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Impressive progress.

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or unimpressive stasis?

I think my fingers may be topping out.

I believe that you reach a 'genetic' speed through day to day typing which if you want to exceed you have to actually specifically train.

At just shy of 80wpm I'm thinking maybe thats good enough though?

I certainly don't feel like typing is in anyway an impediment to my work as a software engineer..

(the d-h mod still isn't 100% though so theres prob a few wpm to be had there over time)

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It's certainly around my "genetic" max so I can relate completely. My plan is to push right above 80 WPM eventually, but no further for me I don't think.

FPS players know that people have different "twitch" speed for instance, so it's no surprise if we have different speed typing capacity as well.

Last edited by DreymaR (27-May-2018 19:58:17)

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I'm not sure where the ceiling is, but I guess there are quite some factors playing into what is our typing speed, there are finger flexibility, and there is the speed that one manages to write accurately. There also the shape that you are in for the day, I know that some days I'm way speedier and a lot more correct than others for example.

But the thing is that ceilings can be pushed through, I'm doing rubiks cube speed solving for example, and in the beginning I had a ceiling on about a minute per solve, and it seemed not very likely to get any better from there. The next plateu was at around 40 sek, and I spent a couple of months just going around that speed before suddenly I managed 35 sek solves, I'm now at 29-30 seconds, and I'm back on a plateu again, there are different things that are holding me back, lookahead, flow and calmness are important just like in typing, it's quite a lot of an analogue really when one things about it.

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i think you're absolutely right sotolf - but specific effortful training is required

I'm not sure I have a requirement to be any quicker?

I once read a book, bounce, by matthew syed. One of the things it covered is how sportspeople 'chunk' actions together in order to perform better/more accurately/faster

Its a mechanism for dealing with the complexity of it, a bit like writing functions in software.

I'm pretty convinced that better typing involves 'chunking' at ever more granular levels, i.e. you move from having to think about letters, to bi-grams, tri-grams, whole words and even groups of words - devolving more and more to the fast unconscious type 1 thinking away from the slow effortful type 2 thinking (terminology borrowed from kahnemann tversky et al)

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Quite. Good speed typists have some quite long n-grams ingrained, usually commonly occurring word snippets. That way they have less "actions" to consider in their flow. These chunks may also involve alternative fingering at the higher levels.

Last edited by DreymaR (30-May-2018 14:06:45)

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bph said:

i think you're absolutely right sotolf - but specific effortful training is required

Yeah, I kind of took that as a given. To push through a ceiling there is of course specific training that is needed. We have a saying in cubing, go slow to go fast. It's not necessarily raw speed that gets you through things, with typing there is stuff like ngrams, and more that really is fruitful for practice. There is a reason why we mostly train a lot of accuracy when it comes to typing, not only because it really helps being accurate, but because it makes you think better about how you write, you have to write more consciously to get higher accuracy, it drills in movements and lookahead in a way that increases speed, even though that's not the focus of the excercise, or at least that's my experience.

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